Tuesday, 16 July 2019 | 05:42 WIB

Preventing Narcotics Use by Combating Cigarettes

Preventing Narcotics Use by Combating Cigarettes (kemhukham)

JAKARTA, NETRALNEWS.COM - Psychologist Reza Indragiri Amriel stressed that one way to suppress drug abuse cases is to fight cigarettes.

"I often say that cigarettes are the ideal gateway to become drug abusers," he said in Jakarta on Wednesday night, reflecting the International Anti-Narcotics Day which is celebrated every June 26.

According to him, ideally the government bans smoking to anticipate the influence of drugs on the younger generation.

Together with the Indonesian Child Protection Agency (LPAI), he urged that cigarettes be explicitly included in the criminal article in the Child Protection Act.

Reza, who once wrote a book entitled "Psychology of Youth Narcotics Users" said that young people are the most vital, at the same time the most risky group of people.

That is, said the alumnus of the University of Melbourne forensic psychology, the government must be careful in addressing issues concerning young people.

Drug abuse, a family that is not harmonious, and economic difficulties, he said, are classically often referred to as the main culprits of crime.

"And all three are here," said the Child Protection Lecturer, Correctional Science Polytechnic (Poltekip), Kemenkumham.

He said young people were an easy target for drug trafficking, as it does not need to take bombs to destroy a country's generation.

"Narcoterrorism. Trafficking in drugs in small packages is affordable, even by children," Riza was quoted as saying by Antara on Wednesday (26/26/2019).

After being addicted, he continued, they would become loyal consumers, and their dosage would increase.

In the early stages, he said, this method did generate small profits, but gradually and within a short period of time consumer demand would go crazy with the potential benefits of the god class.

Reza argues that "pull factor" or attraction factors among children and adolescents can be in the form of solicitation, peer pressure, and the media.

"Meanwhile, the 'push factor' is that children and adolescents are not assertive enough to say 'no'.