Tuesday, 10 December 2019 | 17:39 WIB

Light or Mild Cigarettes May Increase Risk of Getting Cancer

Light or Mild Cigarettes May Increase Risk of Getting Cancer (libreshot)

NEW YORK, NETRALNEWS.COM - If you are a smoker who smokes cigarettes labeled light, lighter, or mild that offers less risk to health because of the lower tar or nicotine content, you may want to reconsider. According to a study, cigarettes labeled light with lower tar or nicotine levels actually have high risk of developing lung cancer.

Cigarettes labeled "light", "mild", or low tar are known to have thicker filters. Generally, light-labeled cigarettes are considered to have a lighter, less noticeable feel, tar levels, nicotine and other chemicals that are lower than regular cigarettes. Therefore, these cigarettes are marketed by the tobacco industry as a "healthier" option.

But, quite the contrary, these cigarettes may actually contribute to the increase in pulmonary adenocarcinoma, the most common type of lung cancer.

The findings in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute show that higher rates of lung adenocarcardion cases are caused by ventilation holes in cigarette filters. Because, ventilation holes in cigarette filters make smokers inhale more smoke containing carcinogens, mutagens and other toxins.

"The ventilation holes in cigarette filters change how tobacco is burned, producing more carcinogens, allowing the smoke to reach the lungs deeper, where adenocarcinoma is more common," said Peter Shield of Ohio State University.

To note, the use of holes in filters or cigarette filters was first introduced 50 years ago. At that time, cigarettes with ventilation holes in cigarette filters were more cigarettes.

"This is done to deceive smokers and the public into thinking that they are actually safer," said Shield.

"Our study shows a clear relationship between the addition of ventilation holes in cigarette filters and an increase in cases of pulmonary adenocarcinoma over the past 20 years," he said. A cigarette filter ventilator is still added to most cigarettes smoked today.

Therefore, researchers urged the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States to take immediate preventive measures. One of them prohibits the use of ventilation holes in cigarette filters.